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A progressive K-12 education for twice exceptional (2e) students.

WHAT KINDS OF KIDS GO TO LANG?

Makers. Thinkers. Dreamers. Innovators.
Go–their–own–wayers. Jokesters. Critics. Artists. Writers. Scientists. Explorers.
Programmers. Inventors. Inquirers. Sleuths.
Creating–our–tomorrow–ers. Trailblazers.
Musicians. Actors. Builders. Seekers.
How–does–it–work?–ers.

WHAT LANG PARENTS SAY…

“Lang is a life saver. They recognize our child’s strengths and build on them. They recognize his areas of challenge and help him work on those.They’ve created a safe space that he looks forward to going to every day. It is better than we ever hoped for. It has changed all of our lives.”

“My son has truly blossomed from the talent development program. The school and his team (teachers, advisors, therapists, administration) have holistically embraced and adapted to my son's passions in ways I could not imagine. They have done an amazing job."

“Lang saved my kid. Before Lang, it was a battle on many days getting our child to school. He had difficulty making friends and keeping engaged in school. Sometimes when he was having a particularly difficult morning, I would call ahead and his school psychologist would meet us outside of the school. Flash forward almost two years and my son is social, has a great group of friends, and looks forward to going to school."

“Our daughter started at Lang as a 7th grader. Prior to Lang, she had lost the love of learning she once had. This ultimately negatively affected her self esteem. Within months of joining Lang, she was holistically encouraged and empowered by teachers and her school psychologist. Lang helped her find her passion. With that in place, our daughter returned to her happy, engaged and confident self. We could not be more grateful to Lang for giving us our daughter back. She’s thriving, an A student and is strongly positioned for high school at Lang!"

“Lang is an ideal match for our child and has been a lifesaver for our family. She gets the supports she needs and is challenged academically. She has met kids who are like her, and we have found a community.”

“Our daughter attended Lang for seven years. When your child has learning differences, but can learn on grade level, and accelerate in certain subject areas, it’s so important to find a school for them that does more than just remediate. Lang was this school. Lang’s strong academics and their excellent support team created a powerful learning environment for her with acceleration and scaffolding in all the right places. Her teachers at her new school tell us over and over how impressed they are with her self-advocacy and willingness to ask questions when she needs help.” 

“Lang provides the opportunity for students to develop their strengths, while also providing the proper tools and strategies for tolerance, self-advocacy, executive functioning, and acceptance. The school fosters students' passions and weaves them into each of their educational plans, which brings about a love for learning. The teachers are terrific at connecting with students and engaging their interests, which makes it such a great community.”

“It’s been a challenge to be able to give our son the help he needed academically since we are not trained professionals. We needed help. Lang has been able to provide us with the structure, encouragement and support we needed while we are on this journey with him. His teachers are just simply awesome and give him so much encouragement instead of trying to stifle who he is. I just see so much more for him now that he is where he belongs.”

“At Lang our son is now surrounded by kids like himself; it has helped him turn into a social butterfly that he never was before. His social skills have taken a dramatic turn for the better and the same is true of his academic performance.”

“The Lang School has been a game changer for my daughter. She was at one of the top private schools in Manhattan where she did not have any opportunity to advance when she had mastered the content. Lang has individually customized our daughter’s school plan. The teachers know her well. No stone is left unturned. Rather than withdrawn and bored, my daughter is thriving, is valued and accelerated in her areas of strength and interest. She has strong self-esteem thanks to the extraordinary teachers and support team! Having the opportunity, where there was no ceiling on what school could tap into has allowed my daughter to be confident and independent.”

“The changes we have seen in our daughter in just a few months since enrolling her at Lang are nothing less than remarkable. Educators who understand and specialize in teaching children with ADHD made all the difference. She is a brilliant child who had been made to feel so much less than what she was at her old school. Her self-deprecation is transforming into self-confidence at lightning speed.”

LOWER SCHOOL
GRADES K–5

A tailored multi-disciplinary plan is created to target each child’s unique needs in a classroom context, where extensive enrichment and acceleration options complement our robustly differentiated curriculum for grades K through 7. We employ evidence-based practices — OTMP/OST, Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD), Zones of Regulation, Collaborative & Proactive Solutions (CPS), daily report cards & more, as needed — to develop self-awareness and self-regulated learning.

MIDDLE & UPPER SCHOOL
GRADES 6–12

We prepare 6th to 12th graders for college by incorporating their unique needs and passions into each school day, offering early opportunities for the development of individual talents, which keeps motivation at the heart of each school day. Our integrated interventions include OTMP/OST (to develop executive functions), SRSD, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), CPS & more, as needed. In BASIS classes, students receive academic acceleration or support 1:1 from content-area specialists.

Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) & Academic Supports

To promote the development of domain-specific skills and to focus on the social-emotional challenges particular to twice-exceptionality, our social emotional learning (SEL) and academic support specialists meet with students individually and in groups throughout the day — pushing into or leading classes for 1:1 in vivo support and didactic learning, as well as pulling out individual students, pairs, and small groups, including during lunch and recess. Our flexible menu of integrated and 1:1 empirically validated interventions are delivered by school psychologists, speech-language pathologists, occupational therapists, Orton-Gillingham certified learning specialists, executive functioing coaches, and gifted/special education-trained content area specialists in order to develop our students’ skills both in and beyond the classroom.

 

Twice-exceptional students often display a tendency toward perfectionism but, with the right mix of SEL and academic supports, our students are able to develop more balanced expectations of themselves and to stay motivated about learning and school. 

Message from the Head of School

Welcome to The Lang School, where you will find that being exceptional is not only recognized but celebrated!

 

It is my honor to serve the Lang community as your Head of School. At Lang we believe that education should be a transformative journey that nurtures creativity, curiosity and critical thinking with an unwavering commitment to our twice exceptional students. Here we embrace the uniqueness of every child and celebrate their diverse talents and interests. Our dedicated team of passionate educators is committed to providing an inclusive and stimulating environment that fosters academic excellence and personal growth. 

At Lang, we go beyond traditional education. Our innovative curriculum is designed to ignite a love for learning and empower students to explore their passions and expand on their giftedness, while growing in other areas that may prove to be more of a challenge.  Through hands-on experiences and collaborative projects we inspire our students to become lifelong learners and engaged global citizens. 

 

With a strong emphasis on individualized instruction, we ensure each student’s learning needs are met. Our small class sizes allow for personalized attention, fostering meaningful connections between students and teachers.  We work tirelessly to develop a supportive and safe community where students can strive academically, emotionally and socially.  For so many of our students, Lang has become a true safe-haven where they can show up as they are, knowing they will be celebrated and supported in their growth. 

 

We invite you to come explore what Lang has to offer and discover the ways we may be able to support your child’s learning.  

 

With warm regards, 

Mark Otto

Our Mission

The Lang School educates twice-exceptional (2e) children — gifted students with learning differences. We offer these highly promising learners a rigorous, child-centered, empirically validated education with integrated supports that foster independence and self-advocacy. We model and teach students to own their impact, and empower them to speak up and stand up for equity and social justice. For most people, the school years are about fitting in, while adulthood is about standing out; for 2e children, standing out comes early. At Lang, through the nurturing of purpose, passion, and talent, exceptionality is not only recognized but celebrated.

Our Practices

The Lang School offers high potential, twice exceptional (2E) students in grades K through 12 a child-centered, classroom-based, STEM- and STEAM-driven education informed by the ethics and poetics of the humanities. Our specially trained gifted and special education teachers differentiate both the content and delivery of our flexibly standards-based academics, so every student receives an education that fits. 

 

Curious young minds thrive here — perhaps for the first time — learning at their level with affinity and ability peers in small classes of no more than 12 to 15 students. For most people, the school years are about fitting in while adulthood is about standing out; for 2E children, standing out comes early. At Lang, through the nurturing of purpose, passion, and talent, exceptionality is not only recognized but celebrated.

 

At the heart of everything we do is student talent development, which surfaces and stokes passions, provides structure and viability for big ideas, instills a sense of purpose and commitment, and, ultimately, develops gifts. Lang is an independent school that supportively seeds, sows, and grows the inspiration of tomorrow's innovators and thought leaders.

 

Academics at The Lang School are based on our integrated curriculum, a paradigm shifting, cross-curricular framework that propels education beyond STEM- and STEAM-based programs. It posits the equal importance of these four major knowledge domains; that they are best explored in an integrated way; and that the skill sets emphasized by each exponentiate learning and discovery in the others. Perhaps most critically, our integrated curriculum restores at its core what STEM and STEAM have left behind: a critical, speculative lens 2,500 years in the making that brings values and ethics back into focus through the humanities, a domain defined not only by art (and the arts), but by history, philosophy, literature, language and linguistics. This integration is engineered by STEM, inspired by the arts, and driven by the humanities.

 

Our menu of integrated and 1:1 empirically validated supports in education therapy, speech, OT, and counseling target academic strengths and challenges, — as well as social-emotional learning — evolving, shifting, and fading as your child develops self-regulated learning and increased independence.

Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, Belonging
and Social Justice

The Lang School celebrates diversity and understands that we all learn and grow best in an environment rich in differences — different racial and ethnic backgrounds, experiences, cultures, abilities, genders, inclinations, interests, expertise, and perspectives. Lang embraces and prioritizes inclusive practices and an inclusive mindset, extending that mindset to all staff, students, and their families. We are committed to examining work through an equity lens: looking at the intersections of identities and the identities of the students and colleagues with whom we work, and reflecting on opportunities to learn and grow.

Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Belonging (DEIB) are part of our daily practice of teaching and learning. At Lang, we build and create a strong sense of community and equity through our mission, curriculum, and daily interactions. We model culturally competent practices and have mindful and meaningful conversations all with the ongoing purpose of forwarding DEIB work and social justice initiatives.

 

Some Animating Ideas for our DEIB work

Civility, self-reflection, growth-mindset, and community are central to the learning experience at The Lang School. Our teachers lean into challenges, own their impact, speak up and stand up for equity and social justice to model these core practices. Additionally, the culture of The Lang School reflects and supports the school's mission in a number of important ways:

 

Celebration of Exceptionality: The Lang School's culture embraces and celebrates the exceptional abilities and diverse learning profiles of our students. Rather than viewing learning differences as obstacles, our school's culture fosters an environment where students feel valued and empowered for their unique strengths. This culture of acceptance and celebration encourages students to embrace their exceptionalities and recognize their potential for success.

 

Empowerment and Self-Advocacy: Our school culture places a strong emphasis on fostering independence and self-advocacy skills in students. Lang students are encouraged to take ownership of their learning, express their needs, and advocate for the support they require. The culture reinforces the belief that students have a voice and can actively participate in shaping their educational experiences, thus empowering them to become self-advocates throughout their lives.

 

Nurturing Passion and Purpose: The Lang School's culture recognizes the importance of nurturing students' passions and talents. We provide an environment where students can explore their interests and develop their skills in various domains. Through personalized instruction, project-based learning, and ample opportunities for creativity and self-expression, the culture of the school supports students in finding their purpose and pursuing their passions.

 

Commitment to Equity and Social Justice: Lang’s culture is deeply rooted in principles of equity and social justice. Students are encouraged to critically examine societal issues, engage in discussions, and undertake projects that promote fairness, inclusivity, and positive change. By fostering a culture that values and addresses social justice, we equip students with the knowledge, skills, and mindset necessary to be agents of change in their communities.

 

Collaboration and Community: The culture at The Lang School emphasizes collaboration and community-building. Students, teachers, leadership, parents/guardians, and trustees work together in a supportive and inclusive environment. Open lines of communication, collaborative problem-solving, and a shared commitment to the mission create a strong sense of community and foster a culture of belonging and mutual support.

 

STRATEGIES, PRACTICES AND INITIATIVES THAT SUPPORT OUR CULTURE

 

Our school culture plays a vital role in ensuring that students thrive academically, socially, and emotionally, while embodying the principles and values at the core of the school's mission. These keystones of our school culture serve as the foundation for the various strategies and practices through which we create and maintain a respectful environment for all members of our community: through various strategies and practices:

 

Valuing Diversity: We recognize and value the diverse backgrounds, experiences, and perspectives of our students, teachers, leadership, parents/guardians, and trustees. We seek to foster an inclusive culture that appreciates and respects the uniqueness of each individual, thereby promoting a sense of belonging and acceptance.

 

Clear Expectations: The Lang School endeavors to set clear expectations for behavior and communication that emphasizes the importance of respect, empathy, and active listening. Students are encouraged to engage in constructive dialogue, express their thoughts and opinions, and listen attentively to others. These expectations apply to all members of the community and are consistently reinforced by teachers, staff, and leadership. Social-

 

Emotional Learning: We incorporate social-emotional learning (SEL) into our curriculum and daily practices. SEL helps students develop skills such as empathy, self-awareness, self-regulation, and responsible decision-making. By focusing on these areas, we foster a culture of respect, kindness, and understanding among our community members.

 

Conflict Resolution and Restorative Practices: We provide resources and support for conflict resolution and restorative practices when disagreements or conflicts arise. Students are taught constructive ways to address conflicts and resolve them through open communication, empathy, and consensus. Teachers and leadership play an active role in facilitating these processes and guiding students towards peaceful resolutions.

 

Professional Development: We invest in ongoing professional development for our teachers and staff. This includes support for the growth of pedagogical practices as well as training on cultural competency, diversity, equity, and inclusion. By equipping educators with the knowledge and skills that are required to create a respectful and inclusive environment, we ensure that the values of respect and acceptance are consistently upheld.

 

Communication and Feedback: We work to maintain open lines of communication among all stakeholders. Regular channels of communication, such as parent-teacher conferences, newsletters, and community meetings, provide opportunities for dialogue, feedback, and collaboration. We encourage active participation and involvement from parents/guardians, ensuring that their perspectives and voices are heard and respected.

 

Policies and Procedures: Our policies and procedures explicitly address respect and inclusivity. These policies outline expectations for behavior, consequences for misconduct, and guidelines for fostering a respectful environment. We endeavor to ensure that these policies are communicated clearly to all members of the community and consistently enforced.

 

Through the implementation of these strategies, we have created and continue to maintain a respectful environment where we hope that all individuals feel valued, heard, and supported. Our commitment to respect and inclusivity are central to our culture and serve as a foundation for the cultivation of positive relationships and meaningful learning experiences. The principles of diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging are integral to our efforts to create a respectful environment. These principles are reflected in initiatives that seek:

 

Value in Diversity: We recognize and celebrate the diversity of our student body, which consists of twice-exceptional (2e) children with a range of learning differences. The school embraces students from various backgrounds, cultures, and identities, promoting an inclusive community where differences are seen as strengths. The acceptance of diverse perspectives and experiences fosters an environment where all students feel valued and respected.

 

Equity in Education: We are committed to providing an equitable education for our students. Recognizing that each student has unique learning needs, we tailor our curriculum, instructional practices, and support systems to address individual strengths and challenges. By prioritizing equity, we seek to ensure that every student has access to the resources and opportunities necessary for their academic and personal growth.

 

Support for Inclusive Practices: We strive to incorporate inclusive approaches into our teaching and learning practices. Teachers employ differentiated instruction to meet the diverse needs of students, adapting their approaches to accommodate various learning styles and abilities. We promote collaboration, cooperation, and teamwork, creating a sense of belonging where students learn from and support one another.

 

Cultivation of a Sense of Belonging: We are committed to creating a welcoming and supportive community where all students feel a sense of belonging. This is achieved through intentional efforts to foster strong relationships among students, teachers, and families. We emphasize the importance of social-emotional learning, ensuring that students develop self-confidence, self-advocacy skills, and a strong sense of identity within the school community.

 

To Address Bias and Stereotypes: At Lang, we actively address bias and stereotypes by promoting awareness, understanding, and empathy. Teachers facilitate discussions and activities that encourage critical thinking and challenge stereotypes, fostering a culture of respect and appreciation for diversity. By engaging in these conversations, we help students develop a deeper understanding of social justice and equity.

 

Greater Parent and Community Engagement: The Lang School recognizes the importance of engaging parents/guardians and the wider community in fostering a culture of diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging. We actively encourage parents/guardians involvement in the learning life of their child, seek their input to help inform program design, and encourage their participation in school activities. This collaborative approach strengthens the connection between the school and our families and promotes a shared commitment to creating an inclusive and supportive environment.

 

By incorporating these principles into our daily practice of teaching and learning, The Lang School works to ensure that diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging are not only valued concepts, but actively embraced and integrated into the school's culture and practices. At Lang, we build and create a strong sense of community and equity through our mission, curriculum, and daily interactions. We model culturally competent practices and engage with students in purposeful, meaningful and action-focused dialog about diversity, equity and inclusion. Our school's commitment to these principles helps to create a safe and empowering space where all students can thrive academically, socially, and emotionally.

Welcome to Lang

On behalf of our faculty, therapy team, and school leadership, I welcome you to The Lang School.

 

The Lang School is both a home and a waypoint on our students' journeys of self-discovery as learners. In our work with twice exceptional students and their families, we are guided by a deep belief in the potential of all learners and by the principle that our school must always strive to fit itself to the needs of our learners. The beliefs and principles that drive learning at The Lang School also define our admissions process. Through this process you will develop a deeper understanding of Lang's mission, programs, and practices as we learn more about you and your child. This collaborative relationship is an essential and defining characteristic of the Lang learning experience. It is how we create the best learning and developmental environment for each child that meets their specific strengths and needs.

 

As a parent, the journey to find the right learning community for your child is one of singular importance. Our goal in partnering with you through this process is to ensure that you learn everything you can about our school community and about how we cultivate in our students deeper learning, an expanding sense of self and connection with others, and a spirit of purposeful engagement with the wider world. Through ongoing dialog with our admissions team, visits to the school and connecting you with past and present parents who can share their Lang experiences with you, we hope that you will come to understand how at The Lang School "through the nurturing of purpose, passion, and talent, exceptionality is not only recognized, but celebrated."

 

We have designed our admissions process to make clear how we empower and teach our students to begin building a foundation for their futures.  To do this, we partner with our families to provide students with the skills and dispositions that will empower them to be their most successful selves academically, socially, and emotionally.  

 

Please feel free to contact me for any questions you may have about our school, the admission process, scheduling one of our weekly tours or to request a 1:1 meeting. I look forward to meeting you soon and welcome you to the Lang learning community.


Gratefully,

Mark Silberberg

Director of Admissions & Strategic Initiatives

admissions@thelangschool.org

1-917-283-2471

Accepting K–12 applications for 2023-2024

Register for one of our tours and/or open houses 

Connect with our Admissions Team by booking a 1:1 INFO SESSION

Application Guide

We welcome your interest in The Lang School. Our application guide is designed to take you through the admissions process from start to finish.

1

GET IN TOUCH

Feel free to reach out to us at any point during the application process. You may begin an application at any time.

ADMISSIONS@THELANGSCHOOL.ORG

or call us at

212-977-7777 (Main Number)
917-283-2471 (Admissions)

2

TOUR OUR SCHOOL

Make a date to tour the school and/or attend one of our virtual Open Houses. You may begin an application without attending a Tour or Open House first.

TOURS & OPEN HOUSES

3

APPLY FOR ADMISSION

Click the icon below to access our application form. 
Once complete, you may submit it via email to admissions@thelangschool.org or via this upload portal.

 

APPLICATION FORM

The application includes copies of the "Information Release" forms. These forms allow us to speak with your child’s school, neuropsychologist, and other critical providers. We will work with you to time these conversations; we understand you may not be ready to tell your child’s current school about your decision to apply out. If you need additional copies, you can download them here and submit via the upload portal below of via email

There is no assessment or entry exam that is required as part of the application process. We do require the submission of a number of supporting documents that are outlined below.

 

INFORMATION RELEASE FORM

4

SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION
 

Is there an entry test for admission to The Lang School?

Is an assessment test required for admission?

 

We do not require a specific test for admission, b ut do require the following supporting documentation: 

 
NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL REPORT

Submit your child’s most recent neuropsychological evaluation. A psychoeducational evaluation is also a good start.

REPORT CARDS

Please send us your child’s school report cards from the last two years, if available. Note that we're more interested in the narratives than the grades.

OTHER DOCUMENTS

Submit any other evaluations or documentation (e.g., a digital portfolio) that might help us better understand your child and their fit at Lang.

CLICK THE ICON BELOW TO UPLOAD YOUR FILES

 

5

APPLICATION FEE

Pay our $125.00 application fee. (Need-based waivers are available.)

6

TIME TO VISIT

If we think Lang may be a good fit for your child,
we will invite him/her/them for a full day visit
(our K and 1 visits are morning half-day visits)

7

ADMISSIONS REVIEW

Our team will review your child's application, supporting documents, and insights from the visit to determine if The Lang School is a fit. If it is, when we meet to discuss your child’s invitation to enroll at Lang, we will share our insights and the educational blueprint we’ve created just for your child.

Tours & Open Houses

We host Tours throughout the school year during the school day. Tours start at 9:00AM and run about 90 minutes.

  • Tours for kindergarten through fifth grade take place on Tuesday mornings.

  • Tours for sixth through twelfth grade take place on Thursday mornings.

Tours provide an opportunity to see the school in action and to hear from faculty and students.

 

Our Virtual Open Houses

take place in the evenings

and provide a forum to learn more about the school, to hear from teachers and members of our therapy team and to hear from current Lang students and parents. 

New events are added regularly throughout the year, so don’t forget to bookmark this page and check back with us to stay up-to-date on all future Open Houses and Events!

You can also CONTACT our Admissions Team if you have immediate questions or book a 1:1 INFO SESSION.

Who is a typical Lang student?

Intellectual or creative engagement is key to student fit at Lang, regardless of how traditionally productive a student has been in past school settings. Often, our students are not inspired to challenge themselves in more conventional programs. Before they arrive at our doors, these high potential learners might say school is boring; their teachers might consider them "lazy" or underachieving; these students might resist or even refuse going to class or school altogether. 

 

The typical Lang School student is able — with the collaboration and support of staff, parents, and outside/previous providers — to capitalize on our individualized interventions, groupings of affinity and ability peers, and differentiated classroom-based instruction. 

While one or more cognitive subtest scores on formal testing may be in the superior range, it is not uncommon for there to be significant discrepancies between strengths and areas of relative challenge. Our students often display precocious interests and curiosities that are reflected in a preexisting area of passion and commitment.  Our high potential and gifted learners also have identified learning challenges, such as ADHD, anxiety, executive functioning  struggles, language-based, non-verbal, and specific learning difficulties (including Dyslexia, Dysgraphia, and Dyscalculia), or Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). We can generally provide support for ASD (Level 1) students who don't require significant 1:1 support and/or in-school ABA therapy. 

The Lang School is not a therapeutic school designed to support significant emotional challenges and as such pronounced externalizing behaviors, frequent dysregulation, and physical and verbal aggression are uncommon among our students. Lang learners are socially motivated and ready for a rigorous but supportive classroom-based education. 

LANG COMMUNITY

Who is a typical Lang parent?

The typical Lang School parent is prepared to partner with school staff in supporting their child in a wide variety of ways with the recognition that school is not a stand-alone solution to their child's every challenge or need. Some of our students need targeted supports beyond school in order to reinforce the school's work, generalize emerging skills across settings, or work on challenges that aren't primarily related to school. That said, Lang is committed to being an active and key member of each student's "village" and to ongoing communication with parents and outside providers. Our parents are eager to engage with the school in a team-based process of identifying and meeting their child's needs as they emerge, develop, and shift. Lang offers parent workshops throughout the school year, and our Parent Association serves as a support network for our parent community.

TUITION & SERVICES

What is the tuition at The Lang School?

 

What does it cost?

Tuition for the 2023–2024 academic year is $92,250. Lang students receive push-in and pullout, 1:1, dyad, and small-group counseling, sensory/fine motor support, speech therapy, and academic remediation or acceleration, as needed. Tuition for midyear transfers is prorated per school day.

PAYMENT & REIMBURSEMENT

How do I pay for it?

The parents of our students with IEPs (Individualized Education Plans) 
successfully seek reimbursement or payment of tuition from the NYC Department of Education. In the service of social justice and to ensure a diverse student body, The Lang School is committed to accepting all good-fit students with IEPs, regardless of financial need. 

What if I want my child to attend a private school like The Lang School and have the Department of Education pay for the tuition? (pdf)

Payment of tuition from the NYC Department of Education (pdf)​

Individualized Education Plans (pdf)

Lang accepts Connors case tuition payments directly from the DoE on behalf of families who demonstrate need. In any given year, at least one-third of our students' parents are pursuing Connors cases.

Depending on a Carter case family’s demonstrated financial need, Lang may provide interest-free tuition payment plans for up to 12 months.

Some parents supplement these payment options with a K-12 student loan through Your Tuition Solution, a tax free withdrawal from their child's college savings plan, a loan from their 401k, or an interest free loan from The Hebrew Free Loan Society

A WHOLE-CHILD EDUCATION

2e Learning

The Lang School prepares twice exceptional (2e) learners for college and life by offering a progressive education that challenges and supports them academically, socially, emotionally, and kinesthetically in the context of classrooms of ability and affinity peers. 2e children have a unique set of social-emotional and intellectual needs, and we embrace them all, meeting students where they are and empowering them to achieve their next level of excellence. 

For students in grades K through 12, Lang's academics are based on a cross-curricular approach combined with curated Common Core Standards. In other words, we re-integrate history, literature, and all of the arts into STEM & STEAM approaches to teaching and learning. Across content areas, curricula and lessons are guided each school year by a scalable, unifying, school-wide theme. 

At Lang, we emphasize the development of critical thinking and questioning skills in both our academics and in our social-emotional learning program. Our partnership with students and families leads to a renewed trust in the possibility that school can be the impetus and locus for authentic learning, success, and inspiration.

LOWER SCHOOL
GRADES K–5

A tailored multi-disciplinary plan is created to target each child’s unique needs in a classroom context, where extensive enrichment and acceleration options complement our robustly differentiated curriculum for grades K through 5. We employ evidence-based practices — OTMP/OST, Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD), Zones of Regulation, Collaborative & Proactive Solutions (CPS), daily report cards & more, as needed — to develop self-awareness and self-regulated learning.

MIDDLE & UPPER SCHOOL
GRADES 6–12

We prepare 6th to 12th graders for college by incorporating their unique needs and passions into each school day, offering early opportunities for the development of individual talents, which keeps motivation at the heart of each school day. Our integrated interventions include OTMP/OST (to develop executive functions), SRSD, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT), CPS & more, as needed. In BASIS classes, students receive academic acceleration or support 1:1 from content-area specialists.

In our Lower School, teachers differentiate curriculum, instruction and class / homework, so each student in the classroom receives an education that fits (and continues to fit) as students mature and individual needs change. A full slate of empirically validated academic and social-emotional supports remediate and accelerate to adapt to each student’s strengths and challenges in each subject. Beyond the three R’s, a wide range of specials classes enrich each day. Our Talent Development program starts young with KidWorks, which gives each child the chance to find areas of passion that can be systemically nurtured and woven into their experience of school as a home base for joyful learning.

The tailored curriculum and instruction of our Middle and Upper School dovetails with and expands on the Lower School’s focus on classroom-based instruction, so students are empowered to take ownership of their learning process and goals as they gradually prepare for college. 6th to 12th graders continue to access a menu of empirically validated pull-out and push-in supports, as needed, to advance their learning and specialization. In BASIS classes, students receive 1:1 academic acceleration or support from content-area specialists. We incorporate students’ unique needs and passions into each school day, offering opportunities for the development of individual talents (IndieStudies) that become the foundation for a college major and keep motivation at the heart of each school day. Beyond taking college entry requirements and college level courses, our Upper School students choose their electives, acquire mentors, develop a portfolio, apply for competitive summer programs, and intern during the school day.

Across grades, a multidisciplinary plan is created that targets each student's unique needs in the context of a classroom of peers, where extensive enrichment, acceleration and remediation options complement our robustly differentiated academic curriculum. We employ evidence-based best practices — a broad range of executive functions training programs (OTMP/OST, SRSD, etc.), Positive Behavior Supports, Collaborative & Proactive Solutions, daily report cards (DRCs), self-reflection, a consonant collection of skills- and goal-oriented therapeutic approaches (Zones of Regulation, CBT, DBT), as needed — in order to improv student self-awareness, increase the ability to ask for and leverage help, and develop a self-regulation toolkit in the social-emotional, behavioral, sensory/physical, and academic learning domains that students will take with them when they graduate from our program.

Guiding Principles for Learning at The Lang School

What we do.

1.

We nurture the purpose, passion, talent, and exceptionality of each student.

 

2.

We provide structure and support for the exploration of deep questions and the having of wonderful ideas, both of which lead to the development of each student’s unique gifts.

 

3.

We center student self-awareness to develop self-regulation skills in the social-emotional, behavioral, sensory/physical, and academic learning domains.

 

4.

We recognize that each learner has their own launch point and journey toward mastery in each subject.

 

5.

We develop for each learner a tailored toolkit for independence and self-advocacy so that learners are empowered to own their impact

 

6.

We cultivate partnerships with students and their families that leads to a renewed trust in the possibility of school as a place for authentic learning, success, and inspiration.

How we do it.

1.

Civility, self-reflection, growth-mindset, and community are central to the learning experience. Our teachers lean into challenges, own their impact, speak up and stand up for equity and social justice to model these core practices.

2.

We center each student’s need for enrichment, acceleration and remediation in our robustly differentiated academic and social-emotional learning program so every student encounters a learning experience that fits.

 

3.

Our integrated curriculum develops in students a critical, speculative lens that provides for multiple points of inquiry, invites varied perspectives and brings values and ethics into focus.

4.

Our rigorous, classroom-based learning builds foundational skills and knowledge and integrates small group and  1:1 support to meet  the unique needs of each of our our twice-exceptional learners.

5.

We surface and stoke passions, provide structure and viability for big ideas, instill a sense of purpose and commitment, and, ultimately, develop gifts that grow the inspiration of tomorrow's innovators and thought leaders

6.

Collaboratively created, concrete student goals are monitored through regular self-reflection and teacher feedback that seeks to increase each learner’s awareness of and connection between thoughts and actions. 

What this means for our learners.

1.

They are supported academically, socially, emotionally, and kinesthetically and are empowered to take ownership of their learning goals and routines.

 

2.

Students discover a learning cycle defined by exploration, "falling in love," and commitment connected to extensive hard work.

3.

They develop their critical thinking and questioning skills to explore varied areas of inquiry and to make connections across subject domains.

 

4.

They develop and refine their executive functioning skills to manage materials, track assignments, manage time, and engage in long-term planning. 

 

5.

They gain skills to identify their emotions and manage their actions, which in turn leads to increased self-regulation, decision making, problem-solving, and conflict resolution skills.

 

6.

They have a voice and a say in how their strengths and challenges are understood and addressed and this models for them constructive approaches to engaging with others.

Lower School

GRADES K–5

The Lang School uses a combination of classroom-based learning, fluid math and literacy subgroups, 1:1 tutoring for remediation, and accelerated learning opportunities in areas of advanced knowledge and/or interest. Teachers differentiate both curriculum and instruction, so each student receives an education that fits in the context of cohorts of no more than twelve students. 

A multi-disciplinary plan is created targeting each child's unique needs, and extensive enrichment options complement our robust academic curriculum. We employ evidence-based best practices — Zones of Regulation, Positive Behavior Supports, Collaborative & Proactive Solutions, daily report cards, and more — in order to grow awareness and skills in social-emotional, behavioral, and sensory self-regulation.

 

Literacy methodologies include Orton-Gillingham, Fountas & Pinnell, Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD), and Teachers College Reading and Writing Workshop (TCRWP). Since many of our otherwise precocious students tend to be resistant writers, the school helps students explore “writing” in a variety of nontraditional ways that build traditional writing skills. Math curricula and methodologies are a hybrid of Singapore Math and math workshop (or math circle).

 

Science, history, ELA and social studies classes are interdisciplinary. In-class work is supplemented by field trips. At least twice yearly, nationally normed reading, writing and math assessments are administered. 

Our developmentally differentiated computer science and engineering curricula engage students of all ages in experiencing the importance of math and logic in comprehending and modeling the world we live in. Our computer science class teaches students K—8 programming skills from the basics of Boolean logic through Java scripting.

 

TECHNOLOGY

A SMARTBoard in every classroom enhances group learning, and each child is assigned their own Chromebook (often loaded with personalized assistive technology tools). Our occupational therapist leads handwriting and keyboarding classes.

Middle & Upper School

GRADES 6–12

Our Middle and Upper School curriculum and instruction dovetails with and expands the Lower Schools’s focus on classroom-based individualized instruction, so students are empowered to take ownership of their learning process and goals. Students continue to access a menu of empirically validated pull-out and push-in supports to advance their learning and specialization. Beyond taking college entry requirements, students choose electives, develop a portfolio, acquire mentors, apply for competitive internships, and choose their college majors — generally by their junior year. ​

 

A multi-disciplinary plan is created targeting each child's unique needs in the context of a classroom, where extensive enrichment options complement our robust academic curriculum. We employ evidence-based best practices — Zones of Regulation, Positive Behavior Supports, Collaborative & Proactive Solutions, and more — in order to grow awareness and skills in social-emotional, behavioral, and sensory self-regulation.

OUR CURRICULUM

Course Offerings

We prepare 6th to 12th-grade students for college by incorporating their unique needs and passions into each school day, offering early opportunities for the development of individual talents that become the foundation for a college major and keep motivation at the heart of each school day.

 

 

Our integrated, empirically validated interventions include DBT, OTMP (to develop executive functions), and more. In BASIS classes at the end of the school day, students receive academic acceleration or support from content-area specialists.

At the heart of everything we do is student talent development, which surfaces and stokes passions, provides structure and viability for big ideas, instills a sense of purpose and commitment, and, ultimately, develops gifts. Lang is an independent school that supportively seeds, sows, and grows the inspiration of tomorrow's innovators and thought leaders.

 

Academics at The Lang School are based on our integrated curriculum, a paradigm shifting, cross-curricular framework that propels education beyond STEM- and STEAM-based programs. It posits the equal importance of these four major knowledge domains; that they are best explored in an integrated way; and that the skill sets emphasized by each exponentiate learning and discovery in the others. Perhaps most critically, our integrated curriculum restores at its core what STEM and STEAM have left behind: a critical, speculative lens 2,500 years in the making that brings values and ethics back into focus through the humanities, a domain defined not only by art (and the arts), but by history, philosophy, literature, language and linguistics. Our integrated curriculum is engineered by STEM, inspired by the arts, and driven by the humanities.

Our Middle and Upper School Talent Development Program draws on and develops student passions daily. Each student is assigned a teacher/coach who helps define and organize the exploration of a specific year-long "IndieStudies" project of the student's choosing. Domains are wide ranging — from studying the history of surgical knots, to creating an multi-media autobiography, to learning to take apart & reconstruct a Porsche — and are individualized to the skills that a student wants to develop further.  At the end of the year, students present their work to a round table of staff and select peers. 

 

It is possible to integrate aspects of a student's IndieStudies project into their core and elective courses (see below).

COLLEGE GUIDANCE

 

Mathematics

Calculus

Typical 12th grade math students take calculus. Calculus is open to advanced and very advanced math students in the Upper School who show exceptional mastery and understanding of Algebra and Geometry. 

Algebra

Typical 8th grade math students take Algebra. Advanced 7th grade students take Algebra with the 8th graders. 

Pre-Algebra

Precalculus 

Typical 11th grade math students take Precalculus. Advanced Upper School math students can be accelerated if they have demonstrated mastery of Algebra and Geometry. 

Seventh and 8th grade math students not yet ready for Algebra complete the Math in Focus (Singapore math) program used in the Lower School. 

Advanced Mathematics

Geometry

Typical 9th grade math students take Geometry. Advanced 8th grade and very advanced 7th grade math students who have demonstrated solid algebraic thinking skills take Geometry. 

Half of our math students complete Calculus before 12th grade and move on to a more open-ended exploration of mathematics across multiple domains, including advanced Calculus II integration, topology, graph theory, combinatorics, statistics, and the like.

Engineering

3D Modeling

Seventh to 12th grade students with a focus on either engineering or creative design learn to virtually model 3D shapes using Blender, an advanced, open-source 3D modeling application. 

Prototyping

Prototyping is intended for 7th to 12th grade students with a focus on creative and industrial design. Students learn traditional modeling and prototyping skills, such as how to work with plasticine clay and casting molds in silicone. 

Engineering

Applied Logic (Programming)

The Upper School Engineering classes focus on both the practical aspects of modern engineering (including electronics) and the principles of physics behind technology (in EM kinematics). Students are introduced to and practice how to apply Ohm's Law. They work with Arduinos to create products with a distinct human objective. The interdisciplinary and core humanistic concepts of our integrated curriculum are emphasized. The course is offered at two levels, for middle school and for high school. 

Students in the Upper School with an engineering focus take weekly classes in Programming alongside a required course in Formal Logic. Typically, these students continue to learn the basics of object-oriented, Java programming using Greenfoot. Advanced students start working in either NetBeans or Eclipse IDE (Integrated Development Environment). 

Computer Science

Computer Science Computer Science is for 10th to 12th graders who intend to pursue a software engineering career and who are already (near) fluent in at least one programming language. Students learn how to implement efficient algorithms for sorting, searching, and other common programmatic tasks. 

Science

Biology

Seventh to 12th grade students with an interest in and advanced understanding of social sciences or dynamic organisms take Biology. The course is offered at two levels and begins with an emphasis on biological systems as a whole. Students then consider the preeminent principle of the field: the biological survival instinct. They investigate how the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics dictates many of the behaviors of organisms, as well as how energy flows through the environment and forces organisms to constantly be on the hunt for good energy sources. Students who have demonstrated an understanding of organic systems move on to Biology II. 

In Biology II, students focus on genetics and biochemistry. Students learn to use trionocular microscopes and practice DNA/RNA sequencing using our thermocycler. 

Chemistry

Eighth to 12th grade students with an interest in the elements of the periodic table (and how the elements react under different circumstances) can take Chemistry I or II. Students in Chemistry I learn to understand the underlying periodicity of elements, the structure of atoms, and their valency properties that cause substances to react with each other. They practice stochiometry and use algebra to predict interactions between substances. Students have access to a fumehood for safely performing potentially volatile experiments. Students in Chemistry II move on to study more complex organic reactions. 

Physics

Eighth to 12th grade students with a focus on engineering and fundamental science study Physics. This course places a heavy emphasis on making physics problems solvable using mathematics, logic, and heuristic methods (such as Fermi estimation). Students consider problems in the domains of kinematics and EM. Precalculus is a prerequisite for this course. 

Arts & Humanities

ELA (English Language Arts)

Advanced 7th to 8th grade writers can be accelerated into our 9th grade ELA class. Ninth to 12th grade students are placed in an ELA class appropriate for their proficiency level and focus in other areas of study. Students accelerated in Comparative History are similarly accelerated in ELA.

Comparative History

Our Comparative History courses focus on understanding the wider causative movements in human history and what has driven dramatic changes in society since prehistoric times. Students compare and contrast periods and regions throughout world history from early Mesopotamian and Indus Valley history to modern upheavals. Students examine how recent societal trends may be analogous to past historical transformations. 

Creative Lab

Our Upper School art program is suitable for both visual artists and young engineers. The courses includes basic drawing skills and more highly conceptual work that incorporates a wide variety of materials, electronics, and digital media as forms of expression. 

Formal Logic

Eighth and 9th grade students are required to take this weekly course, which is also open to 6th and 7th graders with advanced abstraction skills. 

Music

Students committed to learning an instrument are provided 1:1 and/or small group training in composition and technique by one of our music teachers. Students are provided opportunities to practice their skills throughout the week and to perform for our parent community. We also offer chorus, jazz and rock ensembles, and music production courses in our stand-alone music studio. 

Drama

Our drama courses focus on the art of writing and expressing stories, incorporating a wide variety of techniques in acting, improvisation, choreography, and both stagecraft and stage management. More traditional drama practice is complemented by theatre performance field trips and theatre troupe visits to the school. Improvisation coursework emphasizes saying "Yes, and...." to being to peers in the moment in order to achieve a desired effect: laughter. Improv is taught by our drama teacher, a Second City-trained comedian, and our speech therapist (with an eye toward social pragmatics and social development).

Performing Arts

Our performing arts courses focus on the intersection of music, drama, collaboration, and movement. These classes are co-taught by drama and music teaching teams. In partnership with other disciplines and the Lower School, the performing arts students organize two performances each school year.

Our Integrated Curriculum Framework

The school’s curriculum is integrated across the subject domains of mathematics, engineering, science, and the humanities (including the arts). The framework focuses on integrating all strands of academic disciplines: from ELA to the so-called STEAM fields (science, technology, engineering, arts and math). The curriculum framework recognizes that learning and its associated technologies need to be driven by social goals and that innovation is ideally guided by lessons learned from history, philosophical study, and artistic and poetic exploration. Instead of being primarily formed around and centered on “big ideas”, the framework centers on deceptively simple, ageless, and universal questions that we began asking ourselves not long after we acquired language; questions for which we still today seek better answers. 

 

Lang students engage with deep Socratic questioning throughout each school year — course and unit-related questioning that in grades K-5 are based on that year’s school-wide theme. In grades 6-12, the big questions are defined by a five year scope and sequence that prepare students for a successful post-secondary education. Good universal questions can be engaged with at all levels, allowing for effective in-class differentiation. In each unit’s lessons, teachers across grades posit to students a set of developmentally appropriate essential questions that help them pursue thoughtful responses to the core complexities that the bigger, ageless, and universal questions expose. As an organizing curricular structure, this integrated framework recognizes that each learner has their own launch point and journey toward mastery in each subject. The framework’s implicit assumption is that even our youngest students have intellectual lives rich with complex concepts about how and why the world works as it does. Kindergarten and doctoral students alike can engage at their own level with inquiry. Along with learning foundational skills, know-how (content area-specific practical skills), and know-what (content area-specific knowledge) in each course, all students explore how the unit's organizing questions intersect with and interrogate that course’s content.  

 

We support, nurture, inspire, and challenge students as they journey from elementary through high school and as they become productive artists, writers, entrepreneurs, scientists, mathematicians, engineers, and all the other richly diverse roles we take on as adults in our work lives. Lang’s assumption is that school is our students’ first workplace and, thus, should be an examined and values driven experience. True to an interdisciplinary approach, core skills like encoding and decoding, evaluating resources, and configuring and imagining the state of the physical world around us are taught throughout the curriculum and across subjects. 

Core Subjects

LOWER, MIDDLE & UPPER SCHOOLS

Core subjects in the Lower School refer to instruction in English language arts (ELA), math, social studies, science, civics, applied logic, and a foreign language. Science and social studies classes are integrated with instruction in reading and writing, and are taught by homeroom teachers. Math is co-taught by a math specialist (we have Lower and Upper School math specialists) and homeroom teachers.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS (ELA)

MATHEMATICS

SOCIAL STUDIES &
COMPARATIVE HISTORY

SCIENCE

CIVICS

APPLIED &
FORMAL LOGIC

FOREIGN / WORLD LANGUAGE

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

In the Middle and Upper School, core subjects are ELA, math, comparative history, and science — each taken three or four times weekly and worth three credits each — as well as once to twice weekly classes in civics, applied & formal logic, a world/foreign language, and physical education, each worth one to two credits.

CIVICS

Supporting Subjects

LOWER, MIDDLE & UPPER SCHOOLS

Supporting subjects in the Lower School are once weekly, required classes: applied logic, engineering, music, drama/improv, and creative lab (art/makerspace).

3D MODELING

COMPUTER SCIENCE

ENGINEERING

MUSIC & DRAMA/IMPROV

CREATIVE LAB (ART/MAKERSPACE)

In the Middle and Upper School, what is considered a supporting subject depends on the specialization a student is trending towards: engineering, science, creative arts, or the humanities. High school students who take a specific set of supporting courses can have their specialization cited on their transcript.

Electives

MIDDLE & UPPER SCHOOL

Middle and Upper School students can choose to take one to two, once weekly electives per semester, depending on individual schedule and workload. Some electives have prerequisites; all award credits on student transcripts.

ASTRONOMY

COMPUTER SCIENCE

COOKING

CREATIVE WRITING

DRAMA/IMPROV

ELECTRONICS

GAME DESIGN

LIFE SKILLS

MEDIA PRODUCTION

MUSIC ENSEMBLE

SOCIAL JUSTICE

WORLD CULTURES

Talent Development

LOWER, MIDDLE & UPPER SCHOOLS

Lang is fundamentally dedicated to helping students identify, understand, and leverage their precocious abilities and passions, then develop these into talents.

KIDWORKS

INDIESTUDIES

The structure of our Talent Development Program is based on the phases of one's journey toward expertise or eminence: exploration, "falling in love," commitment, followed by extensive hard work. Talent Development in the Lower School is called KidWorks and, in the Middle and Upper School, IndieStudies and Internships.

Core Classes

THE LANG SCHOOL CURRICULUM

English Language

ELA in the Lower School is structured according to the Reading and Writing Workshop model developed by TCRWP (Teachers College Reading & Writing Project). Social studies are woven into much of their ELA classes according to our integrated framework; these students also receive instruction dedicated to explicit reading and writing strategies. Students with diagnosed language-based learning challenges that impact their acquisition of reading and writing skills receive 1:1 support from our learning specialist.

 

In grades K through 5 each student’s reading level is assessed three times each school year using the F&P Text Level Gradient developed by Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. The Gradient assigns a level from A–Z to students based on their demonstrated decoding, fluency and comprehension skills. our fiction library books are all marked according to their F&P level. K–5 students are coached in sustained silent reading (SSR) daily. All students learn to select “just right,” “independent” reading material that is appropriately challenging. 

 

Based on the interests and needs of their students, teachers in each Lower School classroom decide which specific TCRWP writing and reading units of study — persuasive writing, historical fiction, or information writing, for example they will explore and emphasize. Teachers often align student writing projects with subject matter covered in social studies and science. Past projects have included a schoolwide newspaper, poetry anthologies, and multimodal advertising (i.e., posters, videos, and other media). 

 

Students in the Middle and Upper School take ELA four times weekly.

Mathematics

For students in K through 5th grade, The Lang School teaches foundational math skills using the Singapore Math program Math in Focus8. Singapore Math treats mathematics as the singular, stand-alone subject that it is, rather than as a means to an algorithmic or purely practical end.

 

The Singapore Math approach focuses on revealing the conceptual underpinnings of mathematics to students in three steps: concrete, pictorial, and abstract. This process follows the same development as all symbolic and conceptual systems, beginning with the observable and transitioning to abstraction. In grades K-8, Students’ math skills are normatively assessed twice yearly using “i-Ready,” a system based on the Quantile Framework for Mathematics.

Students in the Middle and Upper School use the Core Connections series from College Preparatory Mathematics (CPM). Depending on their current level of proficiency, students in the upper grades generally take the following sequence of classes: 

 

Pre-Algebra

Algebra

Geometry

Pre-Calculus

Calculus

Our most advanced math students receive additional individualized instruction in mastering a wider variety of mathematics (e.g., graph theory, topology, combinatorics, etc.). 

 

World / Foreign Language / French

Exposure to a second language awakens and reinforces each student’s awareness of how language shapes perceptions, insights and identity itself. Our integrated framework seeks to create a deeper understanding of all languages, from French to the highly formalized symbol system of math and to the less formal, more idiosyncratic vernacular of the visual arts. French is the primary language of formal studies in class. Students who are interested in learning other languages often do so through independent study. From 6th grade, and during at least three years in high school, students receive foreign language instruction.

Applied & Formal Logic

The Lang School’s logic curriculum is inspired by the evidence-based proposition that formal operational thinking as described by Jean Piaget does not naturally evolve but is nurtured. As a result, we teach the basics of Boolean logic even to our very youngest students.

 

Our youngest logic learners begin by using applied conditional logic in the form of creating games on the Scratch platform developed by the MIT Media Lab. Scratch provides young students with a block-based coding environment that doesn't require extensive textual decoding strategies. (Computer programs are languages and, as such, unless they are visual and block-based, they require the same decoding skills one employs when reading.) Intermediate learners begin a transition to higher abstraction by learning a form of JavaScript that is oriented towards graphics and gaming. Students then graduate to learning Java through GreenFoot or Python. Students with an interest in pursuing an undergraduate degree in engineering can take computer science courses once they have developed fluency in at least one programming language.

 

Between grades 8 and 12, students are expected to take two years of weekly lessons in formal logic, learning to differentiate between and effectively use inferential versus deductive reasoning. Students move from a more applied practice to a purely abstract use of logic that can be applied formally to the analysis of claims in all subject areas. 

 

Students begin by learning basic propositional logic and gradually move to more advanced frameworks such a relational logic. Understanding how logical fallacies can be used as rhetorical devices to influence people’s opinions is an important part of the class and integrated into our academic subjects across all grades. 

Social Studies &

Comparative History

The Lower School (grades K-5) have a social studies curriculum that is strongly integrated with their ELA. They are trained to think critically about claims made about a variety of subjects in order to prepare them for the comparative framework used in the Upper School.

 

In comparative history, the emphasis is on understanding how to study larger trends in history and to research and compare how different social conditions influenced diverging or similar outcomes. Comparative history takes a grand overarching look at human evolution from hunter / gatherers to our modern globalized society.

Science

Students are taught to reflect on their experiments using the MRACIS sequence — Method, Results, Analysis, Conclusion, Introduction, Summary — and to report their results through the SIMRAC structure (Summary, Introduction, Result, Analysis, Conclusion). The scientific process is introduced as a wider framework of observing, making claims, and verifying claims, as well as relying on peer review, evaluation, and the leveraging of other people’s work.

 

Middle and Upper School students variously have one to three sessions of lab science each week. Lower School students have one session weekly available to work in the lab. During lab science sessions for the youngest students, the emphasis is on familiarizing them with safety procedures and the necessary protocols for all work in the lab. 

Students in the Upper School (grades 6-12) take classes three times weekly from one of the following domains:

 

Biology

Chemistry

Physics

Physical Education (P.E.)

Our P.E. program focuses on developing core strength, proprioceptive awareness, self-regulation, and mindfulness. Students in grades K through 5 receive explicit P.E. instruction weekly in addition to active daily outdoors recess (weather permitting). Grades 6-12 have three P.E. classes per week. Classes utilize our flexible gym space and, when the weather permits, classes often take place in the parks proximal to the school.

Physical education for twice-exceptional (2e) learners at The Lang School is a supportive and inclusive experience that acknowledges the unique strengths and challenges our students may face. 2e children have diverse personalities and abilities, making it essential to avoid generalizations and accommodate individual needs. Our physical education program enhances the 2e student's experience by addressing specific challenges and fostering a more supportive environment. Some Challenges in P.E. Class for 2e Learners: Social Connection: 2e children might struggle with social connections due to their unique characteristics, such as asynchronous development and difficulties with executive functions. This can result in misreading social cues, difficulty in team selection, and heightened nervousness. Sensory Overload: A traditional gym environment is often noisy and overwhelming, with sudden, unexpected sounds like whistles. For 2e students, this sensory overload can lead to overstimulation and reactivity. Perception of Fairness: 2e learners often have a strong sense of justice and fairness, which can lead to frustration during games or competitions when rules are perceived as fuzzy or teammates aren't as committed. Need for Movement: Ironically, the need for movement can be a challeneg for 2e students when they're asked to stand in line or wait for instructions, which may not align with their expectation of physical activity. Negative Experiences: Negative interactions or past challenges in gym class can be strongly remembered by 2e children, leading to anticipatory anxiety and difficult behavior. Lang Strategies for Physical Education Classes: To create a positive and supportive experience for 2e students in P.E. class, we employ the following strategies: Supervision and Safety: We are attentive to 2e students who may need additional support and guidance during class. We help them develop skills in group interactions, understand game nuances, and address sensory sensitivities. Focus on Cooperative Games/Activities: By focusing on collaborative and cooperative play, classes become an important context for students to work on social pragmatic skills and strategies. Many traditional competitive P.E. games and activities can be thoughtfully transformed into experiences that support collaborative peer-to-peer engagement and problem solving. Team/Group Selection: We avoid leaving team/group selection to the students. When called for, we create teams intentionally to ensure that 2e students are with patient and empathetic peers. Assign Responsibilities: We often give 2e students tasks during times of limited movement. This can include completing a fitness cycle or fetching/gathering materials, which helps them understand the rules and remain engaged. Use Humor: We infuse humor into our class to make them more lighthearted as laughter can reduce frustration and tension. Minimize Startling Cues: If a whistle is jarring for some students, we consider alternative ways of getting students' attention. We seek feedback from students to find the most suitable approach. Tailor Activities: We allow students to choose from a checklist of physical activities based on their preferences and abilities. This personalized approach makes classes more enjoyable for everyone. Physical education, when designed with awareness and inclusivity, can provide 2e students with a positive and supportive environment. These strategies help to create a space where all students can enjoy the benefits of physical activity.

THE LANG SCHOOL CURRICULUM

3D Modeling

Students in the Middle and  Upper School focusing on design or engineering can take a weekly class in 3D modeling. Students learn how to model in three dimensions using Blender, a powerful open-source application used worldwide both for animation and engineering purposes. Emphasis is placed on conceptualizing what objects look like from discrete orthogonal angles (front, side, and top), and how they can be decomposed into simpler symmetrical components.

 

This year, students — especially those who have already taken a year of 3D modeling — will approach learning new skills through the lens of the following universal question: How can we model forces? Once they have learned the basics of vertices, edges and faces, and how to define and manipulate them in Blender, novices and beginners will focus on how to use keyframes and inter- and extrapolation to mimic gravity. Intermediate and advanced learners will explore the use of particle systems and the physics engine for simulating more complex forces such as wind and other fluids in motion. 

Creative Lab (Art)

Our Creative Lab program is imbued with the spirit and approaches of the STEAM and Maker movements in education. These movements are new names for what is deeply rooted in tradition: the intricately linked and interdependent nature of art and technology. Each technological revolution has given rise to new art forms, and new art forms continuously inspire new insights into the uses and limits of technology. This renewed and strengthened awareness of the connectivity between science, technology, engineering and math is also embraced by The Lang School’s integrated framework.

 

Younger students use paper engineering, color dying, and other richly kinesthetic activities to express ideas and explore forms. Older students venture into the use of motors, microcontrollers, and other electronics to creatively investigate the meaning(s) of the world around them. Students learn a wide variety of integrative, industrial arts procedures, from silk screening to electroplating. 

 

Drama & Music

Lower schoolers are scheduled for one drama and one music class each week. Middle and Upper School students can elect to participate in a drama or music class once weekly. The drama and music work of all participating students culminates in an end-of-year performance that showcases their accomplishments. 

 

Computer Science

Students in the Middle and Upper School may choose to continue with software engineering after completing the leveled sequence of applied logic courses. These students use enterprise level IDEs, such as Eclipse.They master Python and Java, as well as other object-oriented programming languages (e.g., C#). When taking Engineering, these students learn to use C to program microcontrollers.

The course is a mixture between fundamental computational and algorithmic theory, understanding system design, and implementing these ideas in code. 

 

Engineering

Exposure to engineering is an integral part of our integrtated curriculum. Our program emphasises that engineering is a lens and discipline for solving wider social objectives and that it applies concepts from a wide range of disciplines, from biology and agriculture, to electronics and programming. Students are trained in failure tolerance — a vital skill for all problem solving — through exposure to a continuous cycle of trial and error in engineering classes. Students of all ages taking engineering classes are exposed to the fact that all solutions leverage and are built on the foundations of other people's work.

 

The Lang School’s engineering protocol is encapsulated by The 3 Rules: 

Rule 1: Safety First!

Rule 2: Fail, fail, fail and you will succeed.

Rule 3: It’s okay to borrow from others, just give them credit.

Students across grades learn to use both manual and power-driven tools. They explore the properties and use of various materials, from wood to plastic and metal. Older students program microcontrollers using Arduino®, starting with block-based code and eventually programming their functions in C. 

 

Talent Development

KidWorks

Our Lower School students spend the first three months of each school year exploring each of four domains in weekly two-hour sessions. At the end of this period, based on documented faculty "noticings," the student’s performance, and the student’s interest, a placement in one of our four KidWorks groups is suggested. This school year, our four groups are: 

Illustrators

Tinkerers

Musicians

Storytellers

KidWorks coaches regularly conference with each student, so that students learn to identify and advocate for their preferences. Though native abilities make it easier to master some domains, commitment and hard work are required in order to achieve excellence and can compensate for difficulties in mastering many skills. If a child demonstrates both strong interest and a willingness to work hard, they will be placed in their preferred group regardless of staff observations and recommendations. From January through June, KidWorks students explore projects in their domain in greater depth and with increasing constraints.

 

IndieStudies

Each Middle and Upper School school student is assigned a teacher as a coach with whom they will define and explore a domain they'll dedicate themselves to throughout the school year. Domains are wide ranging — from studying the history of surgical knots, to creating a multi-media autobiography, to learning to take apart & reconstruct a Porsche — and are individualized to the skills that a student wants to develop further.  

IndieStudies students also work with their coach to identify resources and potential mentors outside of the school. A mentor is an expert in the field under investigation who devotes time to working 1:1 with the student (supervised by the coach), providing both feedback and guidance. At the end of the school year, Upper School students present their work, process, and discoveries to a round table consisting of adults with domain-specific knowledge and select peers. 

Lower School students ready to pursue a passion project with discipline and supervision are also invited to participate in our IndieStudies program.

Talent Development

INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION

KidWorks

Our Lower School students spend the first three months of each school year exploring each of four domains in weekly two-hour sessions. At the end of this period, based on documented faculty "noticings," the student’s performance, and the student’s interest, a placement in one of our four KidWorks groups is suggested. This school year, our four groups are: 

Illustrators

Tinkerers

Musicians

Storytellers

KidWorks coaches regularly conference with each student, so that students learn to identify and advocate for their preferences. Though native abilities make it easier to master some domains, commitment and hard work are required in order to achieve excellence and can compensate for difficulties in mastering many skills. If a child demonstrates both strong interest and a willingness to work hard, they will be placed in their preferred group regardless of staff observations and recommendations. From January through June, KidWorks students explore projects in their domain in greater depth and with increasing constraints.

Indie Studies

Each Middle and Upper School school student is assigned a teacher as a coach with whom they will define and explore a domain they'll dedicate themselves to throughout the school year. Domains are wide ranging — from studying the history of surgical knots, to creating a multi-media autobiography, to learning to take apart & reconstruct a Porsche — and are individualized to the skills that a student wants to develop further.  

IndieStudies students also work with their coach to identify resources and potential mentors outside of the school. A mentor is an expert in the field under investigation who devotes time to working 1:1 with the student (supervised by the coach), providing both feedback and guidance. At the end of the school year, Middle and Upper School students present their work, process, and discoveries to a round table consisting of adults with domain-specific knowledge and select peers. 

Lower School students ready to pursue a passion project with discipline and supervision are also invited to participate in our IndieStudies program.

College Guidance

Students in the Lower and Middle School are exposed to career exploration, personal interests, interpersonal skills, and transitional skills needed to move to the next grade level. 

 

The guidance and college counselor works with students to identify and implement developmentally appropriate goals to support their current school success and future post-secondary planning. These goals address their academic, social-emotional, and college/career development. This work involves practicing and improving skills related to academic planning, academic interventions, standardized testing, motivation, resilience, self-advocacy, talent development, college/career explorations, and the college admissions process. 

 

Students receive regular 1:1 and small group support from the guidance and college counselor. This support is delivered in 1:1 meetings, small groups,classroom lessons, College Prep, and Life Skills classes. These lessons are provided at every level, including Lower, Middle, and Upper School. 

Starting in 9th and 10th grades, our Upper School students have targeted lessons that begin with interest and personal exploration, understanding academic expectations, and Lang School graduation requirements. They begin to move into career exploration, the importance of extracurriculars, and resume building. 

 
COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY ACCEPTANCES

ADELPHI UNIVERSITY
BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY
BOSTON UNIVERSITY
BOSTON COLLEGE
HARVARD
CARNEGIE MELON
CONNECTICUT COLLEGE
CUNY BROOKLYN COLLEGE
CURRY COLLEGE
DREXEL UNIVERSITY
FORDHAM UNIVERSITY
GOUCHER COLLEGE
HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY
MARYMOUNT MANHATTAN COLLEGE
MASSACHUSETTES INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
MITCHELL COLLEGE
NEW YORK UNIVERSITY
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY
PRATT INSTITUTE
PACE UNIVERSITY
RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC
SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS
SKIDMORE COLLEGE
SUNY: STONY BROOK
SUNY: PURCHASE
THE NEW SCHOOL: PARSONS
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY
UC: SAN DIEGO
UMASS: AMHERST
UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT
URSINUS COLLEGE
WAGNER COLLEGE
YESHIVA UNIVERISITY

Students (and families) in 11th and 12th grade are provided with an overview and review of the college admissions system. They receive targeted support with the college search and application process. Their focused work with the college and guidance counselor and the application process serves as a way for students to practice  personal, academic, and executive functioning skills. 

 

The Guidance and College counseling department partners with the Indie studies and Junior and Senior internship classes to grow student interests into work and experience that can have a larger community impact.

 

The Guidance and College Counseling Department provides opportunities for students to take the SAT, PSAT, and AP Exams in school to help ensure that students are receiving the necessary accommodations to which they are entitled. The guidance and college counselor also works with students and teachers to identify and coordinate which students will take AP Challenge Exams.


The guidance and college counselor also teaches a Life Skills elective class. In this class students learn information about and practice skills related to different developmental milestones to support students in planning for a smoother transition to college life and adulthood. Topics that are covered include kitchen safety, grocery shopping, first aid, personal safety, finances, self-care, self-advocacy, and independent living.

 

LIBRARY

The Lang School library is truly one of a kind, reflecting the spirit of our twice exceptional students. Unlike the design of most schools, our library is not a single room housing books and desks and computers. Instead, we have shelves of books lining the entire academic hallway, and a librarian who travels from classroom to classroom bringing lessons from the library with her. By design, our library is an interactive space, naturally integrated into each day at Lang.

 

     We believe in student-centered learning, and our unique organization of the texts is a prime example of this, as it is the direct result of student input. For example, the fictional books in the middle and upper school section have labeled genres ranging from “realistic fiction” to “Earth, but there’s magic!” to “non-human POV” to “less realistic fiction.” Rest assured, as informal as this labeling may seem, all of our books are marked with the corresponding Fountas & Pinnell reading level letter, and the lower school shelves are solely organized by reading level. The result is an appropriate balance of quirky innovation and logical systemic organization. 

 

     While the organization of the library is reflective of our students’ input, the stories housed on our shelves represent not only the identities and experiences of our community, but provide a diverse lens into cultures and lived realities that our community members may be less familiar with - narratives and content spanning across the globe and throughout history. It is our mission to not only provide texts that act as “mirrors,” in which students see themselves and form a stronger sense of self, but “windows” in which students get insight into lives unlike their own in order to cultivate empathy and understanding among our young global citizens.

 

     Our mission is to not only foster a love of reading among our students, but to also support them in their journey to become responsible and confident users and creators of information. We do this by providing high quality resources (both physical copies and online databases), teaching research skills and information literacy classes to students of all grades, and always considering the unique and exceptional interests and talents of our Lang students when requesting new materials and individualizing lessons and projects.

Social-Emotional Learning (SEL)

& Academic Supports

To promote the development of domain-specific skills, our SEL and academic support specialists meet individually with students — and push into or lead classes (1:1 support or group-led learning, including during lunch and recess) — in order to focus on the social-emotional and cognitive challenges particular to learning differences, giftedness, and twice-exceptionality. Our flexible menu of integrated and 1:1 empirically validated interventions — school psychologists, speech language pathologists, occupational therapists, Orton-Gillingham certified learning specialists, and gifted / special education-trained content area specialists — promote the development of our students' skills both in and beyond the classroom. Twice-exceptional students often display a statistical tendency toward perfectionism, but with the right mix of SEL and academic supports, our students are able to stay motivated about learning and school.

Our integrated and 1:1 empirically validated intervention options in learning therapy, speech, OT, school psychology, guidance counseling, and target academic strengths and challenges, as well as social-emotional learning (SEL), and they evolve, shift, and fade as your child develops self-regulated learning and increased independence.

Values

 

CIVILITY

 

SELF-REFLECTION

 

GROWTH MINDSET

 

COMMUNITY

Practices

 

ZONES OF REGULATION

 

DIALECTICAL BEHAVIOR THERAPY

 

DAILY REVIEW

 

EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS

TRAINING

 

POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORTS

 

COLLABORATIVE & PROACTIVE SOLUTIONS

 

SELF-REGULATED STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT

 

ORTON GILLINGHAM

Supports & Practitioners

SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS

SPEECH THERAPISTS

LEARNING SPECIALISTS

OCCUPATIONAL

THERAPISTS

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

IN-SCHOOL TUTORING

SENSORY & MOVEMENT

BREAKS

WHAT IT ALL MEANS

Key Supports & Practices Defined

Lang's values coalesce into two primary frameworks for shaping student thinking and behavior: PBS and CPS (see below). All teachers are trained in both frameworks, so everything students do all day long at Lang are steeped in these growth mindset-oriented values.

POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL SUPPORTS (PBS)

As an instructional and classroom management approach, PBS assumes that children respond more productively and in a more lasting manner to positive reinforcement than to punishment. Practices in the PBS toolkit include targeted praise, planned ignoring, clear routines, teacher proximity, and silent signals between teacher and student. 

COLLABORATIVE & PROACTIVE SOLUTIONS (CPS)

CPS is a treatment model and process created by Ross Greene, M.D. to help adults and children articulate and discuss together their concerns about an ongoing challenge, brainstorm potential solutions to this challenge, and agree on an initial approach to solving the "unsolved problem." The CPS framework helps adults see that "children do well when they can," and that challenging behavior has its roots in "lagging skills" rather than, for example, in the desire to seek negative attention. CPS is based on the premise that challenging behavior occurs when the expectations being placed on a child exceed the child’s capacity to respond adaptively. For children, the CPS process gives children a voice and a say in how their challenges are understood and addressed, and it models for them a constructive way to resolve conflict.

ZONES OF REGULATION (LOWER SCHOOL)

The Zones of Regulation is a curriculum geared toward helping students gain skills in consciously identifying their emotions and regulating their actions, which in turn leads to increased self-regulation and problem-solving skills.

DBT STEPS–A (UPPER SCHOOL)

DBT Skills In Schools: Skills Training for Emotional Problem Solving for Adolescents (DBT STEPS–A) is a social-emotional learning (SEL) curriculum implemented in our middle and high schools through a weekly "Foundations" class taught by our school psychologists; these skills are reinforced for Upper School students through 1:1 school counseling sessions. DBT is designed to teach adolescents effective emotion regulation, decision making, and problem-solving skills.

ORGANIZATION, TIME MANAGEMENT, AND PLANNING (OTMP)

OTMP is an empirically based training program for students struggling with executive functions in relation to school-based organizational skills across four areas: managing materials, tracking assignments, time management, and long-term planning. Staff members embed elements of OTMP into students’ daily routines and content instruction; tools employed daily are check lists, specialized paper planners, and Google Classroom.

SCHOOL COUNSELING

Students receive at least 30 minutes of formal school counseling each week with one of our school psychologists. This typically is done individually in their assigned school psychologist’s office. However, school counseling can be offered in the classroom with a school psychologist pushing-in to provide individual support within a class setting or recess, or school psychologists may do multiple check-ins daily with certain students.

STUDENT LIFE AT LANG

Community

Once arriving at our doors, each Lang student quickly becomes an empowered member of their classroom community by helping translate the school's Code of Honor — being civil, constructive, and self-reflective in all our interactions — into guiding principles for their peer group. Students in both the Lower, Middle and Upper Schools take classes together with ability and interest peers, not just age peers, and many Middle and Upper School students take on a mentoring relationship with a Lower School student throughout each school year. While Lower School (and 6th grade) students eat together in their classrooms, then walk to local parks and playgrounds for recess, 7th-12th grade students typically either eat in a designated lunch areas in the school or head into the Financial District in small groups for lunch and return to Lang for games of chess, talks with friends and favorite teachers, or time with a good book.

Community

Once arriving at our doors, each Lang student quickly becomes an empowered member of their classroom community by helping translate the school's Code of Honor — being civil, constructive, and self-reflective in all our interactions — into guiding principles for their peer group. Students in both the Lower, Middle, and Upper School take classes together with ability and interest peers, not just age peers, and many Middle and Upper School students take on a mentoring relationship with a Lower School student throughout each school year. While Lower School (and 6th grade) students eat together in their classrooms, then walk to local parks and playgrounds for recess, 7th-12th grade students either eat in a designated lkunch areas in the school or typically head into the Financial District in small groups for lunch and return to Lang for games of chess, talks with friends and favorite teachers, or time with a good book.

 

Our students engage in service learning in the diverse Financial District community that is Lang's neighborhood — for example, by lending a hand at Trinity Church' Brown Bag Lunch program, which serves the 8 percent of the FiDi's residents living below the poverty line. Lang's many partnerships with NYC's institutions of artistic excellence and community-based programs — including BAM, The New Victory Theater, Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Royal Shakespeare Company, GLSEN, North Shore Animal League, and more — yield frequent student attendance at critically acclaimed performances and visits to Lang by professional artists and community organizers. Classes at The Lang School also go on periodic field trips that support classroom inquiry. Our schoolwide civics program means students are also involved in organizing and advocating for change with local and national political leaders.

Extracurricular Programs

The Lang School is excited to offer a rich menu of different lunchtime and after school programs for our students. Below you will find a snapshot of what we are currently offering this season.

Performance

Music Lessons

Origami (Paper-folding)

Programming/Engineering

Chess

Astronomy

Role Playing Games

Soccer

World War II Club

Esports

Gardening

Improv

Extracurricular Programs

The Lang School is excited to offer a rich menu of different lunchtime and after school programs for our Lower and Upper School Students. Below you will find a snapshot of what we are currently offering this season.

Performance

Music Lessons

Creative Writing

Origami (Paper-folding)

Programming/Engineering

Chess

Astronomy

Tutoring

Role Playing Games

Soccer

Ping-Pong

World War II Club

Esports

Gardening

Rubik's Cube Challenge

Improv

Unlocking Potential: The Importance of Consistent Structures for Twice-Exceptional Students (Part I)

In the diverse landscape of education, where each student possesses unique strengths and challenges, twice-exceptional (2e) students stand out as a remarkable group. These students are gifted and talented in specific areas, yet they also face learning disabilities or neurodivergent conditions. Supporting their growth and harnessing their exceptional abilities while addressing their learning difficulties requires a delicate balance. At The Lang School, one critical aspect of this support is the establishment of consistent structures and routines.

Understanding Twice-Exceptional Students

 

It's critical to first understand the complexities of twice-exceptional students. These students often face a unique set of challenges. On one hand, they possess remarkable talents, such as advanced problem-solving skills, creativity, or a deep passion for a specific subject. On the other hand, they may struggle with issues like dyslexia, ADHD, autism, or anxiety, which can hinder a school’s ability to to support their needs in a traditional classroom environment.

 

Imagine a child who demonstrates exceptional mathematical aptitude but finds it challenging to sit still and focus for extended periods, at times creating noises and movement that might create distractions for others. This child might be mislabeled as disruptive or unmotivated, rather than recognized for their untapped potential. It's within this context that consistent structures become indispensable.

 

At Lang we spend weeks and months establishing routines and structures at the start of the year that are consistently reinforced. It can feel repetitive at times but that repetition is key to ensuring clarity for all students about our process and expectations that supports us in times of challenge.

 

Creating a Safe and Predictable Environment

 

Stability and predictability are paramount for 2e (twice-exceptional) students as they navigate the complex intersection of their exceptional abilities and learning challenges. These students possess both extraordinary talents and learning disabilities, making their educational journey a unique one. Establishing a stable and predictable environment in both the home and school settings is crucial.

 

Consistency in schools and home can support students in several ways:

 

  1. It allows 2e students to develop a sense of security and emotional well-being, which are fundamental for their overall growth. When they know what to expect, they can better manage anxiety and stress, which often accompany their learning differences. At Lang all classes begin with the review of the agenda for each class allowing students to gain an understanding of what is to come.

  2. It enables educators and parents to tailor support strategies effectively, ensuring that the strengths of 2e students are nurtured while addressing their specific needs. At Lang students understand the various support structures available to them and we provide opportunities for students to choose what is best for them. For example, if a student needs a quiet atmosphere they understand the expectation to choose a quiet nook where they can work alone or to put on headphones that will help reduce the sound.

  3. It enhances executive functioning skills in students by providing a structured foundation upon which they can develop organization, planning, and time management abilities. At Lang, students can anticipate their daily routines and expectations, which reduces cognitive load and allows them to allocate cognitive resources more efficiently. This, in turn, fosters the growth of executive functions, leading to improved self-regulation and overall academic success.

In the realm of education, no two students are alike. Twice-exceptional students, with their unique blend of talents and challenges, require special attention and support. The importance of consistent structures in schools for these students cannot be overstated. Next week we will explore how consistent structures can support the fostering of a growth-mindset.

 

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